The Man Who Killed His Own Son- Assassin’s Creed Origins

WARNING: Spoilers for the prologue of Assassin’s Creed Origins.

So, my birthday was late November, and my partner got me Assassin’s Creed Origins! I’m a huge history nerd, but I mainly lean on the side of modern European history, so Ancient Egypt is a huge difference from what I am used to. However, Ancient Egypt is actually one of the only civilizations and time periods other than modern history that I’m interested in. Watching the Yu-Gi-Oh anime would do that to you, I guess.

Now, we all know that I am very picky when it comes to games. I prefer straight forward games, preferably turn-based combat. Whatever the gameplay, it needs to be story-driven. I hadn’t heard great things about Assassin’s Creed. I was interested, because of history, but I had heard so many bad things as of late, I would much rather stick to my normal games. But I decided to try it and I was excited. I had played a little bit of Assassin’s Creed 2, and I what I had played of that.

The main character – Bayek – is a medjay. I did not quite understand the whole thing but after talking to my partner, he told me that Bayek was basically the first Assassin and that’s how it fits into the whole thing. Anyone who knows me knows that I get emotionally attached to characters scarily quick, so I loved him straight away. I got to Siwa, his hometown, and did a few quests. I tried my best to be sneaky, and I think I did a good job. I’m finding it much easier to be sneaky in this game than any other game I’ve played.

Regardless of the gameplay and everything else, there’s something in the game that shocked me. I’ve played a few games, and I’ve watched my partner play a bunch too, but there’s never been a moment that has shocked me like this one. I have a bad habit in open-world games of not… exploring as one should. I know that I should, but if it’s not part of a quest… I struggle to find the point of it. But after this scene… it felt wrong to start a new quest. I just ended up wandering around the map, going to the little question mark parts.

The scene I’m talking about occurs after Bayek kills Medunamun (the quest is level 5, I think), the player gets transported in time. Now, I assumed that Bayek’s son was dead as I had previously come across the quest ‘Bayek’s Promise’, which suggests that his son was dead. The gameplay part after the assassination of Medunamun basically shows how close Bayek was with his son. There are some cute moments, and you can tell that they love and care for each other deeply.

When Bayek gets knocked out and taken somewhere unfamiliar, it is a bigger shock to find his son there (Bayek had told him to go home to his mother). When the Pharaoh arrives, the people who brought him to the place leave, probably to tend to the Pharaoh. Bayek’s son manages to steal a knife from one of them so that Bayek is able to cut himself free from his restraints. However, it’s too late. By the time he’s free, he’s in a fight.

He goes to stab one of the men… who grabs Bayek’s hand… and rams it into his son’s chest.

Bayek killed his own son.

This moment was so impactful. It was a mix of shock, heartbreak… mainly shock. Bayek loved his son so much, and he ended up killing him while trying to protect him. At that moment, I was not okay. I needed a while to process what just happened. Bayek was such a good father. He pushed his son to be the best version of himself, while still being there to hold his hand and direct him when it was needed. And suddenly he was gone, at Bayek’s hand.

I knew I needed to write a post on this because it was so… impactful. I’ve never had a moment in gaming that I just had to stop for a moment. I’ve cried before, sure, but this was different. I struggle to find the words to express the shock that I felt, the… betrayal that I had felt.

I am not the best at linking two and two together. I think the only time I’ve ever managed to do it is in Persona 5 when I realized that Akechi heard Morgana talk and he shouldn’t have because only people who had been to the Metaverse can do that. I thought that Bayek was going around and killing these people because they killed his son. But no. It’s so much deeper than that. He’s doing it, not out of revenge, but out of guilt. The first murder we see where the knife is in the mask and Bayek slams it on the guy’s face is so much more impactful now that I know that these people forced Bayek to kill his own son.

I haven’t played much of this game yet, but it’s so… I wish I was able to think of a word other than ‘impactful’. It shocked me so much that I actually had a dream about it. I know Assassin’s Creed doesn’t have the best reputation lately, and the gameplay is nowhere near perfect, but this- this story, this moment- it was special.

I think everything just happens so quickly. For all I know, my brain just overthought this whole thing and I now look like an idiot for posting this on my blog. Personally though, as someone who has written quite a lot of fiction since I was 11, this moment was more than the shock and the horror. It was beautifully crafted. Bayek didn’t need more of a reason to want these guys dead other than them being the reason that his son was dead. But he still has it. He wants them dead because they are the reason that he took the life of his son. He is the reason that he and his wife have no son anymore. He’s guilty and angry, and he needs to do this not for his son, but for himself. Because he needs to redeem himself in his eyes, and the only way of doing that is by killing all that was present.

And that’s all for today, Gamers! I thought you might like to know that I have played yet another game, and it was impactful (so maybe I should play more games? But Persona 5 is so good…). Let me know your thoughts in the comments, and don’t forget to like for me to do a little happy dance, and follow for more Gaming content! Follow my Instagram to see any changes in my schedule or to see what I’ve posted when. I will see you next time 😊  

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